Flash Nonfiction

Misjudgment

From her appearance, I imagined she was a spinster, who probably worked her whole adult life in a warehouse: taking inventory, answering the phone, and getting coffee for important people.

Misjudgment

From her appearance, I imagined she was a spinster, who probably worked her whole adult life in a warehouse: taking inventory, answering the phone, and getting coffee for important people.

Running into her in a café and sitting down to talk, it turned out she’d been married for twenty-nine years and was still very much mourning her husband who’s been gone seven years. She said that before she retired, she was vice president of a software company she turned around from being in the red to being worth over a billion dollars. She’d traveled around the world and lived in places like Buenos Aires, Hong Kong, Tokyo, and Paris.

After saying, “So long. See you in class!” I thought to myself, Here, again, I judged a book by its cover, and in this instance, I was as wrong as I’d ever been before—that is, if she was telling me the truth. . .


Jeffrey Zable is a teacher, conga drummer/percussionist, who plays Afro-Cuban and Afro-Haitian folkloric music for dance classes in San Francisco and Berkeley. He’s also a writer of poetry, flash fiction, and flash non-fiction. More recent publications include Ink In Thirds, Uppagus, Defuncted, Lucent Dreaming, The Mark, Alba, Corvus, and many others.


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